EGR delete cable

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amber.2

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I have recently installed a Provent oil catch can , that hopefully will in the long run stop carbon build up in the inlet manifold,also wondering if a EGR Delete cable would be of any benefit ,or is the Catch can enough ?
 

Old.Tony

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The combination of oil vapour and soot are the major problem. Remove one and the intake manifold improves significantly.

EGR (apart from being an emission control device which, if tampered with and discovered could cost you a lot in fines) in the more modern vehicles can't be physically completely blocked because from about 2012/2013 they included a flow sensor in the EGR valve (which some "defeated" by using a 6mm hole in the blanking plate to allow a small amount of exhaust through). Defeating it through editing the ECU might work (although I'd never consider it myself) but if Nissan ever reflash the ECU the edit will be lost.

There would still be some benefit to removing EGR, which causes a reduction in available oxygen within the combustion chamber, resulting in lower temperatures (the goal of introducing EGR) and a corresponding reduction in the amount of diesel combusted per combustion cycle, which not only creates even more soot (soot is unburned diesel) but robs the engine of power.
 

tweak'e

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i'm on the fence with deleting egr on newer engines. simply because a lot of the turbo, manifolds etc are all sized around the engine using egr.
i would be looking at limiting the egr flow rather than removing. that should reduce the amount of soot made (and rate of dpf blocking up) and load on the cooling system.
 

TomR

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The delete cable works as advertised. The V9X will feel different. Gone was that stumble at a constant 60km. Regards, Tom
 

KwakaZX10R

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The delete cable works as advertised. The V9X will feel different. Gone was that stumble at a constant 60km. Regards, Tom
Hi Tom. How does this cable work? I had read elsewhere on this forum that the torque converter engaging / disengaging / engaging is the reason why at 60k/h you have that surging feeling. If I shift into sports mode and hold it at 60k/h to try and repeat the surging, it will not do the surging as the gearbox stays in a lower gear. Curious, as I am not sure how the EGR cable can have had an effect? Cheers
 

tweak'e

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the egr delete cable connects into the air temp sensor and makes the ecu think its at -40c. ecu is programmed to keep egr off when its that cold.
however there may be other functions the ecu does because of the air temp.
i don't recommend those cables because you don't know what other functions are effected.
eg it possible the gearbox won't use the lock up clutch in an effort to keep the gearbox warm because it thinks the outside temp is so cold. i have no idea if thats the case or not.
 

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I do not the technical details, but I know the EGR opens only at constant throttle. Plenty of people have them. It is just a plug and play item.
 

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Just to add, the gear hunting at 60km was corrected by Nissan with a new MAP. Late there was still a stumble but not the gear hunting.
 

KwakaZX10R

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Just to add, the gear hunting at 60km was corrected by Nissan with a new MAP. Late there was still a stumble but not the gear hunting.
Mine does not hunt gears, but does surge slightly, on and off, if I sit smack bang on 61k/h in drive. If I change to sport mode, it shifts back a gear / disengages the torque converter (or whatever it does) and the surging disappears.
 

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A few things I want to add to the discussion here to clear things up.

1) When is EGR used?
EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) is used any time that the temperature is correct and mid-range throttle is being applied. At low temperatures, idle and full throttle, EGR is turned off.

2) Is it good to block EGR?
It's a "Yes AND no" kinda answer. First off, it's illegal. It's specifically an "emission control system" and tampering with it - if detected - can see you in hot water - but it's kinda hard to detect. Recent ECUs take the EGR into account and calculate things like boost pressure, fuel rail pressure etc based on EGR being there, so removing EGR might affect the engine's performance negatively. In older vehicles, removing the EGR doesn't affect the ECU's program, but it does make the combustion process run a little hotter, and if you combine an EGR block with a performance chip you might create an overheating issue, particularly if your performance chip doesn't monitor exhaust gas temps (good chips do).

3) Torque converter and lockup
Sadly, this is a topic that I'm quite familiar with, having been through two rebuilds of my own gearbox before tossing it and putting in one from a wreck. Traditionally in an automatic, the torque converter takes rotation from the engine and passes it into the gearbox. The input shaft (the engine side of the torque converter) also drives a pump that pushes the oil (automatic transmission fluid, or ATF) around inside the gearbox where it's used to trigger events through valves etc (which is why you shouldn't tow an auto too far or too fast). The torque converter itself isn't a solid drive, it transmits rotational movement by the oil sitting between flat faces of the two halves of the torque converter. This does mean that some engine RPM is lost (compared to a manual, which loses no RPM between the engine and the gears). This is wasteful, and they started designing special clutches (the TCC) that would engage and lock the torque converters under certain conditions. My own 2009 D40 locks its TCC at 68km/h, but only in overdrive and only when the gearbox is warm enough and the demands weren't too high (no full throttle there!). I can add that the TCC will STAY locked at 125km/h or more no matter how hard you press the throttle (my thanks to the NT govt for the 130km/h speed zone where I figured that out).

Now, back to normal programming. Or in my case, I'm delivering ice cream to Norway.
 

amber.2

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A few things I want to add to the discussion here to clear things up.

1) When is EGR used?
EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) is used any time that the temperature is correct and mid-range throttle is being applied. At low temperatures, idle and full throttle, EGR is turned off.

2) Is it good to block EGR?
It's a "Yes AND no" kinda answer. First off, it's illegal. It's specifically an "emission control system" and tampering with it - if detected - can see you in hot water - but it's kinda hard to detect. Recent ECUs take the EGR into account and calculate things like boost pressure, fuel rail pressure etc based on EGR being there, so removing EGR might affect the engine's performance negatively. In older vehicles, removing the EGR doesn't affect the ECU's program, but it does make the combustion process run a little hotter, and if you combine an EGR block with a performance chip you might create an overheating issue, particularly if your performance chip doesn't monitor exhaust gas temps (good chips do).

3) Torque converter and lockup
Sadly, this is a topic that I'm quite familiar with, having been through two rebuilds of my own gearbox before tossing it and putting in one from a wreck. Traditionally in an automatic, the torque converter takes rotation from the engine and passes it into the gearbox. The input shaft (the engine side of the torque converter) also drives a pump that pushes the oil (automatic transmission fluid, or ATF) around inside the gearbox where it's used to trigger events through valves etc (which is why you shouldn't tow an auto too far or too fast). The torque converter itself isn't a solid drive, it transmits rotational movement by the oil sitting between flat faces of the two halves of the torque converter. This does mean that some engine RPM is lost (compared to a manual, which loses no RPM between the engine and the gears). This is wasteful, and they started designing special clutches (the TCC) that would engage and lock the torque converters under certain conditions. My own 2009 D40 locks its TCC at 68km/h, but only in overdrive and only when the gearbox is warm enough and the demands weren't too high (no full throttle there!). I can add that the TCC will STAY locked at 125km/h or more no matter how hard you press the throttle (my thanks to the NT govt for the 130km/h speed zone where I figured that out).

Now, back to normal programming. Or in my case, I'm delivering ice cream to Norway.
So Tom a manual would benefit more from a EGR Delete cable than an Automatic ?
Mainly because mine is a Manual ,
 

tweak'e

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1) When is EGR used?
EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) is used any time that the temperature is correct and mid-range throttle is being applied. At low temperatures, idle and full throttle, EGR is turned off.
for older engines yes.
however these days thats not strictly true. they can run egr at idle and at full throttle.
some engines run egr constantly. it all depends on what the manufacture had to do to pass the emission standard.
 

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